Summers on Grandma’s Farm

Hey, Everyone! How did you spend your summers?  I am re-posting Summers on Grandma’s Farm from July 2016.

Summers on Grandma’s Farm

A gray barn like Papa’s. I took this picture near Springfield, MO.

A gray barn like Papa’s. I took this picture near Springfield, MO.

 

Maywood Christian Camp

When I was a girl growing up in south Alabama, my parents would take my brother and I up to north Alabama to attend Maywood Christian Camp for a week, and then my dad’s parents would pick us up and take us to their farm for another week.

My cabin at Maywood Christian Camp.

My cabin at Maywood Christian Camp.

 

North Alabama is further from the Gulf of Mexico than my home town, thereby a lot less humid, which was nice!

I’m sure the first day back from camp was spent resting up, we would attend church on Sunday, and then the rest of the week was full of wide-open possibilities!

Farm equipment on my cousin’s farm. My cousin now owns my grandparents’ farm.

Farm equipment on my cousin’s farm. My cousin now owns my grandparents’ farm.

“Big” City

Grandma always took us into town, which is Russellville, Alabama, a much bigger town than what we were used to.

She would buy us each a toy at TWL, and we would go to a big grocery store.

Since my parents owned a general store in Jachin, we weren’t used to going grocery shopping, which was great fun! We loved to help pick snacks and sugary cereals that we would consume during the week.

 

Big Gray Barn

Then we would head back to our grandparents’ farm, and eventually end up playing in their great big gray barn, which was stocked with hay, spider webs, and so much dust.

Our parents would come and get us at the end of the week.  We were always so glad to see them and missed them so much!

We would go back home to our own piece of Alabama, which had an entirely different culture and it’s own rendition of an Alabama farm.

Our south Alabama farm.

Our south Alabama farm.

 

Summers on Grandma’s Farm

GrayBarn1

A gray barn like Papa’s. I took this picture near Springfield, MO.

When I was a girl growing up in south Alabama, my parents would take my brother and I up to north Alabama to attend Maywood Christian Camp for a week, and then my dad’s parents would pick us up and take us to their farm for another week.

Maywood7

My cabin at Maywood Christian Camp.

North Alabama is further from the Gulf of Mexico than my home town, thereby being a lot less humid, which was nice!

I’m sure the first day back from camp was spent resting up, we would attend church on Sunday, and then the rest of the week was full of wide-open possibilities!

Farm_tractor

Farm equipment on my cousin’s farm. My cousin now owns my grandparents’ farm.

Grandma always took us into town, which is Russellville, Alabama, a much bigger town than what we were used to.

She would buy us each a toy at TWL, and we would go to a big grocery store.

Since my parents owned a general store in Jachin, we weren’t used to going grocery shopping, which was great fun! We loved to help pick snacks and sugary cereals that we would consume during the week.

Then we would head back to our grandparents’ farm, and eventually end up playing in their great big gray barn, which was stocked with hay, spider webs, and so much dust.

Our parents would come and get us at the end of the week.  We were always so glad to see them and missed them so much!

We would go back home to our own piece of Alabama, which had an entirely different culture and it’s own rendition of an Alabama farm.

cropped-thepond1.jpg

Our south Alabama farm.

 

Dreamin’ of the Islands, Mon?

Destin, Florida

Destin, Florida

It was a very pretty 50-degree day today, but yesterday was rather dismal.

Fortunately, our local radio station was kickin’ up some great tunes that brought back memories of beach vacations.

It’s great hearing the calypso and steel drums when it’s cold and drizzly outside.

Here are some of my favorites:

Banana Boat Song (“Day-O”) – Harry Belafonte

Blondie – The Tide is High

Johnny Nash – I Can See Clearly Now

Anything by UB40

Anything by the Beach Boys (especially, Kokomo)

What about you? Which are your favorite songs that take you far from the winter ice?Destin_Florida3Destin_Florida2

Destin, Florida

Destin, Florida

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All work Copyright 2015 by Stephanie L. Robertson.

The Dingle-berry’s Guide to a Yard Sale Cost Profit Analysis

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I’ve never claimed to be good in mathematics. I’m doing good just to know my multiplication facts.

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Just the same, you would think I would be able to count up my profits from Saturday’s yard sale and figure out what I made versus the time worked and cost of advertising.

But I bungled that effort.

See, I had plenty of quarters to make change. Plenty of dimes, nickels, pennies. I had about $5 or $10 in dollar bills. $34 worth of small change to start with.

I just didn’t think that people would be wanting me to make change in return for a $50. For something that cost 75 cents.

My fault.

So when this happened more than once, I had to dash back into the house to find whatever $5’s or $10’s that I had on hand. I was in such a hurry to get back to the customers that I didn’t think. And I completely lost track of how much I brought out from inside.

Oops.

“So how much did you end up making?” Lefty asked me Saturday night, when I was counting my money.

I felt my face flush.

I'm sooooooo confused.

I’m sooooooo confused.

“Um…I don’t know, exactly. Maybe anywhere from $25 to $50?”

Lefty looked confused, but I did, too. Perhaps I did end up with $50, which isn’t that bad for a small yard sale. I got our house rid of some of the excess clutter, but Mom had given me some clothes to sell, too.

If you take what you earn at a yard sale, it can be very disheartening, considering American minimum wage.

I’m not so sure that one can look at it like that, though.

Doing a yard sale has intangible rewards. Like getting to meet other people. I got to pass out cards that advertised my blog. Princess Buttercup got to learn about free enterprise with her very successful lemonade stand.

Will I ever do another yard sale again?

Absolutely.

But next time I’ll have enough change.

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