The House on Persimmon Tree Road, Part I

The house on Persimmon Tree Road.

Last Friday I got a heaping dose of southern hospitality when I visited a very old house on Persimmon Tree Road.  The first time I saw the strange house with the porch piano was when I went with my Mom-and-Dad-in-love to Loretto, Tennessee.

“Did you see that old house?” I gasped. “It had an upright piano on the porch!”

“Want me to go back so you can take a picture,” asked by husband’s dad.

“Would you mind?” I asked.

My sweet Dad-in-love turned the car around so I could take the picture.

Upright piano on front porch.

Piano keys stripped of ivory.

I Couldn’t get the House on Persimmon Tree Road out of My Mind.

I was obsessed with the house, so I went to the county probate office as my first step in researching the place.

I had 3 questions:

1. Who owned the house?
2. When was it built?
3. Why was there an upright piano, decaying on the front porch?

I got the name of a family who lives nearby and searched their name on Whitepages.com.

Nervous but determined, I punched the number into my iPhone. You never know when you make a cold call. You can get told off or you can uncover a fascinating story about the past.

I was thankful that I got the latter.

Gabled roof.

Front porch with upright piano.

The Whites from Persimmon Tree Road.

Not only were the nearby homeowners (Ray and Glenda White) related to the original home owner, they invited me to their home to talk about the house on Persimmon Tree Road.

I brought my mom-in-love along, who lives in the same county. She conversed with Glenda while I talked to Ray.

Like most southerners who live in a small town all their lives, Glenda and my mom-in-love discovered multiple people that they both knew.

Glenda gave me a big hug when I walked through the door. The consummate extravert, she reminded me of my paternal grandma, but she is about my mom’s age. Ray and Glenda have been married 50 years.

Like myself, Glenda loves to visit flea markets, estate auctions, yard sales, antique malls, and the like.

Ray is quiet and unassuming. In the 1980s, he nearly lost his life from a sun stroke when he was working at his un-airconditioned gas station.

His great-grandparents had the house on Persimmon Tree Road built in the late 1800s.  I’ve got some more to say about the Persimmon Tree Road house, so watch for it in up-coming posts!

Meanwhile, do you have an old house you’d like for me to research and write about?  Let me know, because this has been one fun writing project!

Eaves surrounded by hundred-year-old oaks trees.

 

Do you believe that houses have eyes?

***
#oldhouse
#1900s
#southernlife
#southernfamilies
#ruralAlabama

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2 thoughts on “The House on Persimmon Tree Road, Part I

    • That’s what first drew my attention. I play the piano (not well, but I do play), so I know what you mean. But it was weighing down the joists inside and they had to move it somewhere. I would love to make it into some kind of home décor piece!

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